5 Ways to Help Students Show Thankfulness in the Classroom

November is such a wonderful month for so many reasons.  Christmas is just around the corner, fall is in full swing, s'mores and campfires blazing all across the country.  But in November, some much more special happens - we take time to express out gratitude towards the things we are thankful for.  We spend time sharing our thanks with others and encouraging others to do the same.  This includes the classroom!  What better way to make November something special for your students, than by taking time to practice showing thankfulness for all they are thankful for!  Check out these 5 unique ways to help students show thankfulness in the classroom!


3 Second Conversations

Taking time to talk to your students about what they are thankful doesn't have to be a huge ordeal!  It could take you 3 seconds each day, per student just to talk to them about something they are thankful for.  Try this - Place a large, laminated turkey outside of your door.  Each day, write on it a 'topic' (food, person, place, object, etc).  Then in the mornings in November, stand outside your door to greet your students in the morning.  Have them read the topic and tell you something they are thankful for that relates to the topic.  Like this.. "Good morning Josh!  Give me a food you're thankful for!"  'I'm thankful for pizza because it's so delicious!'  "That's a great one, Josh!".  See?  Three seconds!  

Build a Thankful Tree

Your students have so much to be thankful for!  Why not put it all together in one big display for everyone to see!  On a large poster/anchor chart/bulletin board (your choice) make a large, bare tree!  Call it "Our Thankful Tree".  Then cut out small leaf cutouts and place them in a centralized location.  Allow students at appropriate times to fill out leaves of things they are thankful for and place the leaves on the tree throughout the month of November to see their thankfulness grow!  It makes a super fun display.  Don't worry about filling it all right at the beginning - let it grow naturally throughout the month!  

Thankful From A-Z

As adults, we make lists - grocery, to do lists, honey do lists, etc.  Students love to mimic this!  Why not let them with this unique Thankful List using all of the letters of the alphabet!?  Give each student a piece of paper with the letters A through Z written on them.  Then have them come up with something that starts with each letter of the alphabet that they are thankful for.  It could be a person, a place, an object, anything!  They can share these with partners, compare lists, display them in the classroom, and so much more!  Want to extend it more?  Have them pick ONE of the letters in their list to write more about.  These make great writing journal prompts or early finishers in writing class!  

Make a Thankful Jar

Don't have time to make a big tree?  No problem - you can
still use the same idea, but this time in a very compact way!  Find a small jar or container that you already have laying around your classroom and slap a (cute) sign on it and call it your "Thankful Jar"!  Lay out scraps of paper for students to write out things that they are thankful for at appropriate times throughout the day.  Then either when the jar is filled OR at the end of the week (whichever you prefer) go through the jar together as a class, reading all of the papers out loud.  What things do people have in common that they are thankful for?  What differences are there?  This makes a perfect community circle activity during the month of November too!  

Make a Mini Book

What better outlet to show our thankfulness than to write about it?  Get your students writing about things that they are thankful for by writing and making little mini books!  You can make these simply but cutting a piece of printer paper into quarters and stapling them together, or even just folding them.  Doesn't have to be anything fancy!  But students DO love making a fun book - just wait and see!  Have the students illustrate on each page something they are thankful for and then below it write what it is and WHY they are thankful for that item.  Encourage them to think outside of the box - more than just people and places.  What actions are they thankful for?  What are they thankful for in themselves?  The possibilities are endless!

Want to grab all of these thankfulness printables for *F*R*E*E?  Just enter your name and home email address below to get them ALL straight to your inbox!  


Want to save these amazing ideas for later?  Make sure to pin one of these pins below to help!




November Read Alouds Your Class Will Love

     One of the best parts about teaching is getting to read out loud to students!  The look on students' faces when the plot thickens, the relationships they build with characters..  It all brings joy to teachers everywhere.  November is a fantastic month to share unique and meaningful read alouds to students.  I have gathered six of my FAVORITE November read alouds that your class will LOVE!  Come dive in with me and find one (or two!) new favorites for yourself as well!

November Read Alouds

(This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that Amazon sends me a little pocket change, at no cost to you, if you purchase through one of these links. This helps keep my site running and funds giveaways for you!)

Thanksgiving Read Alouds:

Balloons Over Broadway is an adorable Thanksgiving story that takes students back to the beginning of the traditional Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.  We read and learn about Tony Sarg, the inventor of the helium filled balloons that make the parade a unique and traditional event every Thanksgiving and how the parade first came to be. 



Thanksgiving in the Woods is the PERFECT book to read to your students and discuss Thanksgiving traditions.  The story is about a large family who gathers every Thanksgiving with many of their extended family and friends to a Thanksgiving feast in the woods.  They work together to cook, decorate, and suit up for the cold weather, all to enjoy a huge feast, fun, and celebration together.  Students will absolutely relate to this beautifully illustrated read aloud in many unique ways!  Definitely a must read for every classroom!

Election Day Read Alouds:

Monster Needs Your Vote is an absolutely adorable and funny read aloud that even primary students can listen to and understand about how and why voting is an important and fundamental human right.  Follow Monster and the narrator (a little boy) along their journey of trying to explain the voting and election process.  Monster wants to vote, but he's not yet 18.  So he decides to run for a position and finds out that there's so much that goes into a campaign.  Simple language, broken down ideas, and beautiful illustrations help truly make this read perfect for any elementary class!


Today on Election Day takes you on a journey with many different elementary age students and their families on Election Day.  Follow characters to the voting polls, helping family members run for office, voting for the first time and so much more!  This amazing read aloud truly helps break down the entire process that goes into such a monumental day for our country.  It also helps students bring out different perspectives and connections that they might have experienced with their families on Election Day!

Veteran's Day Read Alouds:

The poppy flower has forever been the symbol of honoring and remembering veterans from our country.  But do you know why?  The Poppy Lady is a beautifully written story that tells about Moina Belle Michael, a school teacher from the World War 1 era who was saddened when her students, friends, and family were sent out to fight.  She felt like she needed to do something to help share her appreciation with for these brave men.  She established the red poppy as the official symbol of remembrance for all veterans.  The Poppy Lady is beautifully written and illustrated and students can see how one small effort can make a big difference!  

Grandad Bud is the perfect story for our current generation to help learn about Veteran's Day.  In the story, we follow a young school age boy who's great grandfather has been invited into the classroom to speak to them about Veteran's Day.  The young boy is unsure of what to expect on his grandfather's visit.  He ponders about what the true meaning of Veteran's Day is and soon, along side his entire class, finds out.  


I hope this helped you find a new November read aloud!  If you'd like to save this post for later, feel free to pin the image below!  Happy November!

November Read Alouds


I've Given an Exit Ticket, Now What Do I Do? (& a FREEBIE!)

Exit tickets are one of my non-negotiable when it comes to something that I have to have in every single one of my lessons.  If you teach a lesson and don't give an exit ticket, what was the point of teaching that lesson?  What data did you collect and how do you know what to do next? Yes, you might be able to gather some qualitative data, but to truly know what the students know, you need to give an exit ticket!  So now that I've convinced you, what do you do AFTER you've given an exit ticket?  There are so many amazing ways to use Exit Tickets!  Keep reading to learn just a few fun idea on what to do after you've given an exit ticket!

Need some fresh ideas on how to use Exit Tickets in your Math or ELA lessons?  Read this article with loads of ideas for elementary teachers on how to use exit tickets after they've been given.  You can even download your FREE printable exit ticket sorting mat templates to help organize the exit tickets after they've been collected.  Exit tickets help make student learning more focused and achievable!  Come read about how you can collect the data but use it in unique ways too!

#1 - Use them to help your students reflect on their learning

When you've given a short exit ticket, you've just collected a student's thinking and what better way to collect that data than to also collect their thinking about HOW they did on the exit ticket or HOW they feel on the content itself.  Having students reflect on their exit tickets is a simple way to get the students' opinions about where they are in their learning journey.  You can do this in a lot of ways:  When turning in exit tickets you can have them sort them into a specific tub or folder based on their level of understanding, you can have them rate themselves (using a Marzano's scale perhaps) and write their number in the corner of their exit ticket, or you can simply have them draw a smiley face on their exit ticket next to their name to show how they feel.  Use this time and allow students to reflect on their learning when you give them an exit ticket!

#2 - Identify the most common misconceptions 

After you've given an exit ticket, you now have all of this data in your hands.  Don't just check them and throw them away or give them back.  You need to USE the data!  Here's what you can do:  Go through each exit ticket that had a mistake on it and write down all of the errors that students are making.  If you find repeats, then just put a tally next to them.  When you're done, look at your list and identify the top three misconceptions that students made on their exit ticket.  Now here's what's best - Take that list and write it on the front board the next day (or next lesson) for the students.  Number them #1 -3 and pass back the exit tickets to the students.  Have them analyze their exit ticket and match the mistake they made to the misconception on the board.  If their mistake matches have them write the number on their exit ticket.  This just became their goal for today's lesson.  This is now their focus to fix and work on and improve.  We've now taken this data and given it back to them and put the learning into their hands.  So powerful & meaningful!

#3 - Use them to group students

Make grouping students more practical and quicker with this easy strategy.  As you're grading your exit tickets, label them.  Make a key for yourself so you don't forget.  (Example - square = high, triangle = average, circle = low).  Write a shape (or whatever you decide to label) on their exit tickets.  Then when you give them back at the next lesson you can easily have them form mixed ability groups, like ability groups, pair up high/low, etc.  This makes your grouping much faster and more strategic!  

Want a printable FULL of amazing ideas on how to use Exit Tickets AND some exit ticket sorting mats?  Subscribe below and they are all yours!
Need some fresh ideas on how to use Exit Tickets in your Math or ELA lessons?  Read this article with loads of ideas for elementary teachers on how to use exit tickets after they've been given.  You can even download your FREE printable exit ticket sorting mat templates to help organize the exit tickets after they've been collected.  Exit tickets help make student learning more focused and achievable!  Come read about how you can collect the data but use it in unique ways too!

#4 - Conduct 'Error Analysis'

Students are going to make mistakes on their exit tickets, so let's use these mistakes to our advantage!  Gather up all of the 'incorrect' exit tickets and at the start of your next lesson, anonymously place an exit ticket under your document camera and showcase this as your 'favorite mistake'.  Ask students why it's your favorite mistake.  What mistake do they see?  How can we fix it?  You can repeat this process with 1-3 exit tickets depending on time.  You can have students fix the error collaboratively as well to get them talking right at the beginning of the lesson.  

#5 - Conduct mini conferences

Again, so much data at your finger tips but don't be selfish and keep it to yourself!  Since your exit tickets are short and sweet (no more than 3-4 quick questions), going over them individually with students shouldn't take long either.  I like to keep a pile of them on my desk (if I'm not using them for another reason like mentioned above) and I have mini conferences with these students at very random times.  Why not take them with me when standing in the hallway waiting on students to use the restroom?  I can easily have a talk with 1-2 students about their exit ticket, how they did and what they need to improve on.  Or what about when you're waiting on students to get coats and book bags to line up to go home or go to lunch?  There's 2 minutes you can talk with someone about their exit ticket too!  You'd be surprised how many mini conferences you can squeeze in when your conversation is focused around a short exit ticket!

There are MANY more ideas where these came from.  Just subscribe by the photo above to grab your printable idea list & exit ticket sorting mats!  

Too much information to read today?   Make sure to Pin Me to read later!

Need some fresh ideas on how to use Exit Tickets in your Math or ELA lessons?  Read this article with loads of ideas for elementary teachers on how to use exit tickets after they've been given.  You can even download your FREE printable exit ticket sorting mat templates to help organize the exit tickets after they've been collected.  Exit tickets help make student learning more focused and achievable!  Come read about how you can collect the data but use it in unique ways too!

Need some fresh ideas on how to use Exit Tickets in your Math or ELA lessons?  Read this article with loads of ideas for elementary teachers on how to use exit tickets after they've been given.  You can even download your FREE printable exit ticket sorting mat templates to help organize the exit tickets after they've been collected.  Exit tickets help make student learning more focused and achievable!  Come read about how you can collect the data but use it in unique ways too!



Best Practices Needed in Every Lesson!

Best practices are called so because they have been proven to get results.  But knowing that there are LOTS of them, is it realistic to ask that a teacher to have every possible best practice in every one of their lessons?  No!  It's possible, yes, but definitely not realistic to ask of a teacher.  Teachers need to figure out which best practices work for them and get the best results for their class and focus on those!  However, in my opinion, there are a few best practices needed in every lesson, no matter what!  Today, let's break down that list of must have best practices and talk about why they are non-negotiable.

So many best practices and don't know where to start?  This article helps break down 5 best practices needed in every lesson.  These are my non-negotiable for every lesson that help get the best results academically from my students.  Grab your FREE printable list of best practices to help you narrow down what you can and should be focusing on in your own classroom!

#1 Best Practice - Always have an objective

Objectives are the goal of the lesson or what you're focusing on.  It's very important for students to know and understand specifically what I'm focusing on when teaching.  The more specific you can get with your objective, the better.  I also try to make sure my objective is written out visually and stated to them verbally throughout the lesson.  Even having students state the objective with you to get them more involved helps too!  Another reason an objective is so important is that it creates a muscle memory connection of actually DOING the activity along with the objective itself.  So as students are practicing the content and hearing the objective being stated - they are connecting the two together in hopes that when they hear those words (objective) again they will remember how to complete the problem or questions from before.  Many times teachers assume that students know what they are practicing on - stop assuming and focus on having a specific objective for every lesson!

#2 Best Practice - Always have an anchor chart

Whether it's something you created in 5 minutes with clipart from Google or something you took time on and used your beautiful lettering skills (jealous!) - have some sort of visual or anchor chart for every lesson that you do!  You are going to reach more students who have different learning styles by doing so.  Also having an anchor chart helps students anchor their learning to the chart itself.  Best practice is to make the anchor chart WITH your students, but I know that that's not always an option.  An anchor chart helps create a visual reminder for whatever the content is and the more you use it with your students and refer to it throughout your lesson, it's engraining the content and learning in their minds in hopes that when they aren't near the anchor chart but discussing the content, the visual is engrained in their minds to use in the future!

#3 Best Practice - Model during your lessons

By modeling I mean that you are completing a problem or a question from beginning until end for your students without their help.  Make sure you're not having your students help you during the model.  Students need to hear your thinking to solve the problem or question from the beginning until the end to know what they should be doing when solving the problem on their own.  All of the questions and interactions in the middle hurts their understanding the concept and puts it into pieces.  You can break it down later, but when modeling at the beginning it needs to be uninterrupted modeling.  Ask yourself questions out loud so the students know what kinds of questions to be asking themselves when they are solving independently.

Overwhelmed by which best practices there are and where to start?  Download this amazing and *F*R*E*E* list of best practices and start by checking off what you're already strong at.  Then look at what's left and you know what you can focus on and where you can grow!  This comprehensive list of best practice is great to keep when lesson planning and use to think about how to best reach your students!

Grab your FREE Best Practice List!

Subscribe to get the list sent straight to your inbox!
    We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time.
    Powered By ConvertKit
    So many best practices and don't know where to start?  This article helps break down 5 best practices needed in every lesson.  These are my non-negotiable for every lesson that help get the best results academically from my students.  Grab your FREE printable list of best practices to help you narrow down what you can and should be focusing on in your own classroom!

    #4 Best Practice - Collaboration

    In every lesson, there needs to be an opportunity to collaborate with other students, not just with the teacher.  This needs to be MORE than just a turn and talk!  At the end of a lesson if you can stop and ask yourself "Did I talk more than the students?" and if you answered 'Yes' to that - there's a problem!  We need to make sure they are talking more than us!  We need to make sure we are giving them the opportunity to have time to process the content and their thinking without the teacher being involved.  When you're allowing them time to collaborate with one another then they are being time to process.  Whatever guided practice or independent work they are doing, just make sure they have time to talk and process with others!  Need help getting your students to collaborate?  I have an amazing post all about building a culture of collaboration!

    #5 Best Practice - Make sure you have an exit ticket

    Having an exit ticket is CRUCIAL!  If you do a lesson and don't collect data at the end of that lesson - then why did you teach the lesson in the first place?  You need to make sure that at some point you're collecting data from your lesson.  It can be as simple as having them whisper an answer to you, write on a post it note, have a 1/4 sheet of paper ready with 1-2 questions.  No more than 3-4 questions tops!  Make sure you have SOMETHING!  When you do that you're getting that data from your students, you have grouping strategies you can use, you know what misconceptions your students having and where to go on your next lesson.  There are so many amazing ways to use exit tickets and their data!  These are so powerful and we need to be utilizing that power in the best way possible!

    Too much to read at once?  Try pinning this post for later!  

    So many best practices and don't know where to start?  This article helps break down 5 best practices needed in every lesson.  These are my non-negotiable for every lesson that help get the best results academically from my students.  Grab your FREE printable list of best practices to help you narrow down what you can and should be focusing on in your own classroom!




    Getting Started with Small Groups

         You've started school and are excited and ready to jump into your routine!  I get it - we all are eager to get the merriment going and establishing your day to day schedule.  But..  there is such a thing as jumping the gun, especially when it comes to rolling out your small groups.  Getting started with small groups is a meticulous process that takes time, so let's break down this process together so when the time comes, you'll be ready!

         The best way to get started is to work backwards.  Think about your ideal classroom where centers & stations are all working beautifully without interruption and then map out your plan of how to get there.  What do you need to teach your students how to do in order to achieve that vision?  What date do you want that vision to be in place by?  This post is all about identifying things that could go wrong when launching and trying to prevent them all from happening, allowing you and your class to have the best small group roll out you can!

    Make sure you have everything you need to get started with small groups.  Read all about these important parts of small groups to teach before getting started!  Plus grab your awesome small group roll out plan template freebie!


         Here is a list of items to think about teaching and/or preparing your students for when getting started with small groups.  Some of these might be items that you're already used to teaching to launch your small groups and others might be new!  

    #1 - Transitions:  

         This is an obvious one, but a rather important one as well.  Make sure you show and teach your students how to transition to and from their small groups, how to transition between each individual small group, & how to transition with materials in hand.  Also make sure to discuss the timing of your transitions so students know their expectations on how long these transitions should take.  

    #2 - Expectations:

         This is a large concept to make sure to break down and teach to your students for small groups.  What do you expect of them while they are in small groups, working with partners, working with an adult in a small group, etc.  This may overlap your 'normal' classroom rules but you will find that there are changes that are made to accommodate the small group setting - so be sure to be specific and lay these expectations out for your students

    #3 - Workload:

         When preparing students for small groups - make sure to explain to them what their workload will look like at their stations.  What are the students being expected to do or work on?  What is their role?  Do they have must do activities and then may do activities?  What should they do when they get frustrated?  Be explicit and explain this to better your chances to avoid needing to redirect students later.

    #4 - Schedule:

         This is one of the biggest hurdles to get through when getting started with small groups.  Do students know their schedule?  Make and display a student friendly visual for them to refer to to help avoid them asking you questions about when and where to go. Take time to practice reading through the schedule and practice where to go.  

    Make sure you have everything you need to get started with small groups.  Read all about these important parts of small groups to teach before getting started!  Plus grab your awesome small group roll out plan template freebie!


    ~Grab Your Small Group Roll Out Plan~

    Just subscribe & download!  Then you can create your own rock solid small group roll out plan!
      Thank you for subscribing!  I'm so glad to have you.  
      Powered By ConvertKit

      #5 - Your job:

           Make sure to take time to explain what you will be doing during centers and stations.  How will students know when to approach you?  When your job is clearly communicated to students, they take more care and understanding of you and your time with other students.

      #6 - Accountability:

           When students are working independently or with others without an adult, accountability is important to be upfront about!  How will you be checking in on students and their work?  How will they turn in completed work?  Will their work be graded?  Letting your students know about their accountability will help keep them responsible from the start.  

      #7 - Objectives:

           This is one that, over the years, I've found to be very important to explicitly explain and teach during my small group roll out.  When I plan out my centers - I make sure to write out and explain the objective of each center to the students.  Meaning - if I have a listening center where they listen and complete a graphic organizer, I make sure the students understand that that station is to increase their comprehension.  If I have a technology station where they are playing a grammar app, I make sure that they know that they are working to better their understanding on grammar concepts.  Be very upfront about what the students are to be learning in each center to help create more buy in and connection to the learning process.

      #8 - Materials:

           This is another one you're probably used to explaining - the use of your materials in centers.  What are the expectations when they use materials in small groups?  How are they to take care of them?  Where do they find them and return them?  What do they do with them when time is up but they are rotating to another center.  Make sure to break this one down as it can consume a lot of time after you launch if you haven't been as clear as you should of been.

      #9 - Early Finisher:

           Very important to think through prior to launching small groups!  What will you students do if/when they finish their work at their center?  Where will their completed work be turned in and what are they and are they not allowed to work on when done?  This is a great chance to throw in some differentiated work as well for your students!

      #10 - What If's:

           This is something I HIGHLY recommend doing at least once in your roll out plan before launching.  Have a 'what if' conversation with your students.  If you're anything like me, you hate 'what if' questions..  But for students, those questions are important to them.  When you're close to launching, take time to allow students to ask as many what if questions as they can think of!  Go through some 'what if' scenarios yourself with them - like, what if students are absent or what if the schedule changes?  Having a 'what if' day can help lessen some anxiety for many students!

           So what now?  Grab your free calendar template above (or create your own in your lesson plan book!) and map out your roll out plan.  Pick your launch date and work backwards thinking of all of the items from this list (and your own list) that you need to teach and put them on your calendar!  Then teach your roll out plan to your students during what WILL be small group time.  By the time your launch date arrives, they will be pros and you'll have the smoothest roll out to small groups you've ever experienced!  I promise!  

      Too much to read now?  Make sure to pin this article to read later!

      Make sure you have everything you need to get started with small groups.  Read all about these important parts of small groups to teach before getting started!  Plus grab your awesome small group roll out plan template freebie!





      4 Classroom Management Must Do's {With a FREEBIE}

           Whether you're brand new to the classroom or have been teaching for 20 years, classroom management is always an important part of teaching to 'keep up with'.  Something that worked great last year with your class might tank this year.  We always have to be on the lookout for new and amazing trends, strategies, and ideas to try to each new class!  However, the foundations of classroom management stay the same.  You've heard them all before, I'm sure:  Stay consistent, be fair, use positive redirections..  I could go on!  But instead, I've come up with my four Classroom Management Must Do's!  Here is what I believe every teacher should know (& do) when it comes to classroom management!

      As a classroom teacher, make sure you are always doing these 4 classroom management must do's.  Read all about these important strategies and grab your ready to use freebie!

      Classroom Management Must Do #1:  Teach the WRONG Way

           Classroom management in other words is known as procedures & expectations.  These are the 'things' that we teach to our students mainly at the beginning of the school year and then reinforce throughout the remainder of the year.  The process typically goes as such:  teacher shows and explains the correct way to do a procedure or complete an expectation, students practice doing the procedure or expectation the right way, teacher encourages students to continue to do procedure correctly throughout the school year.  What do I say about this?  This is WRONG!  We need to ALSO teach our students how the procedures are done the WRONG way!  Yes, I said it.  Students need to be able to know and see their parameters, meaning what are they allowed to do and NOT allowed to do.  We, as teachers, assume students know what the procedure would look like the wrong way and why its the 'wrong' way to do said procedure - but that's not the case.  Allowing students to SEE the procedure/expectation being done the incorrect way allows them to know exactly what the teacher hopes NOT to see.  This allows the students to know exactly what to do and exactly what NOT to do, giving them more clear parameters than if you were just to teach the 'right' way.  I promise you - it works!

      Classroom Management Must Do #2: Keep Things Fresh!

           We all have our own classroom management systems that work of us, whether it's using a 'clip up, clip down' chart or ClassDojo - you do what works for you!  BUT..  with that being said, I have a feeling you know that using JUST that one system doesn't work all year long.  You know there will
      Need some new ideas for classroom management?  Try out these awesome freebies and read all about my 4 classroom management must do's!
      come a time when students will stop caring or your system will lose its shiny new glow.  It happens to us all!  Here's what you have to do:  Keep things fresh!  That doesn't mean keep changing your management system - keep that the same all year.  However, you DO need to have some awesome and motivating tips and tricks to use as classroom management 'extras' to pull out when you need.  I keep my own little 'Bag of Tricks' on my desk at all times and pull out a card when I know or think my classroom management needs a boost, my students need a boost, or we just need a spruce of FUN in our lesson! 
            Some fun examples:  keep some delicious flavored chapstick in your desk and pull it out during your lesson.  Anytime you see a student meeting expectations, give them a dot of chapstick on the outside of their hand to smell! 
      Need some new ideas for classroom management?  Try out these awesome freebies and read all about my 4 classroom management must do's!
      They love it :)  OR try this:  Give each student 1-2 tickets before a lesson begins.  Set a class goal for how many tickets you want to collect during the lesson.  As you complete the lesson, and students are participating or meeting expectations - collect a ticket from them and place them in a cup.  At the end of the lesson count to see if you've met your goal and celebrate!  

      Classroom Management Must Do #3: Healthy Competition 

      Need some new ideas for classroom management?  Try out these awesome freebies and read all about my 4 classroom management must do's!      Competition at the right moment in the right lesson can really help with classroom management.  I'm sure you've done table points or group points before when trying to get students to meet certain expectations.  It holds students accountable and brings them together, all working towards a cause - winning!  Now, too much competition isn't necessarily a good thing but intentionally and sporadically placing this strategy when and where it's needed can potentially impact your classroom management.  One of my favorite ways to do this is with Behavior Tic Tac Toe!  There are two sets of cards - one with positive behaviors that I hope and expect to see in the classroom and one with negative behaviors that I hope I do NOT see.  I copy them on two different colors of cards to help distinguish between them.  Then I place the Tic-Tac-Toe board in the front of the room.  If I see positive and exceptional behaviors, I pick the card that matches the behavior and allow a student to place it on the board.  On the other hand, if I see a behavior that's not meeting expectations, I find that card and I get to place it on the board.  The first 'team' to get three in a row WINS!  This is fun and it helps focus in on specific behaviors rather than behavior as a whole!

      Grab Your Phone a Friend & Behavior Tic-Tac-Toe Freebies Today!

      Grab & download these fun classroom management freebies!
        We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time.
        Powered By ConvertKit

        Classroom Management Must Do #4: Let Them Talk More! 
        Need some new ideas for classroom management?  Try out these awesome freebies and read all about my 4 classroom management must do's!      At the end of a lesson, one of the questions I always ask myself is 'How much did I talk at them and how much did I allow THEM to talk?'  I want to make sure, in every lesson, that they have been given ample amounts of opportunity to talk.  Just doing a turn and talk here and there isn't enough.  They need time to work together, collaborate, and dive into the content without having to hear me talking at them during the lesson.  So if you want/need your classroom management to improve, this might be an area to try to reflect on!  One thing I do at the beginning of the year to hold myself accountable for this is by taping these fun 'Phone a Friend' templates on each students' desk.  One of the first weeks of school we then take time to fill it in.  It's super simple and fun to set up and then it's here to use all year long!  Basically students will (when setting up initially) carry around their phone looking for 9 different partners.  When they find a partner they will write each other's names on the SAME number on their phone.  (So I write my name on their #1 and they write their name on my #1).  When the phone is full, I tape it to their desk.  When I want them to get up and talk to someone in the middle of a lesson I say "Dial friend #5 and go see what they think!" - Then they check their phone, find that friend and chat!  It's a great system and it gives them voice and choice and takes time out of having to pair students up together.

        So again, whether you're a veteran teacher or a new teacher - there are many things that with classroom management you just need to know!  I hope these tips and tricks were helpful!  Didn't have time to read the whole post?  Feel free to pin the image below to read later!

        Need some new ideas for classroom management?  Try out these awesome freebies and read all about my 4 classroom management must do's! As a classroom teacher, make sure you are always doing these 4 classroom management must do's.  Read all about these important strategies and grab your ready to use freebie!




        Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...